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20121001
20121009
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KPIX (CBS) 10
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
to uphold the state's new law requiring voters to show photo identification. the law was passed by the republican-controlled state legislature and vigorously opposed by democrats. at issue is whether the law will prevent any registered voter from casting a ballot. democrats claim it will make it harder for their traditional voters, young adults and minorities to vote. >>> overseas. syria's foreign minister accused the u.s. and its allies of promoting terrorism and escalating the fighting in syria. speaking before the united nations general assembly yesterday, he criticized calls for president bashar al-assad to step down. one activist group says 40 people were killed yesterday. we're learning more about the taliban attack that killed three americans in afghanistan. a suicide bomber on a motorcycle struck just as a patrol of afghan police and nato troops got out of their vehicles at a market in eastern afghanistan yesterday. in all, 14 people died in the bombing. >>> eight american airlines jets have been grounded so inspectors can check out potential problems with passenger seat
interest in law to tell people about this? >> we do believe genetically engineered foods are a problematic, health concerns, leads to allergies and health effects showing up in the studies that have been done. environmental problems. yesterday, the new york times had a story about the massive increases in pesticide use over the last 15 years of genetically engineered crops, tied to the crops. >> is your goal to end genetically modified foods? >> it's to give consumers the choice, that's how the market is suppose to working. we decide, voting with dollars, making choices about what we eat and feed families, about what we want in the food system. >> the bottom line for families listening, is this going to increase the cost at the grocery store? the no on campaign says yes. it's going to cost hundreds of extra dollars a year to require the labels. >> they have no evidence to back that up. we think no increased cost will come of the law, it didn't happen in europe and didn't happen when we asked for trans fats. it gives them 18 months to do it. it's a straight forward labeling law. >> yes on
, the confrontation with the law that brought the rush hour commute to a screeching halt. >> initially i thought the cough was bronchitis. >> cleaner isn't always better. how it's making some people sick. >>> good evening. i'm dana king. >> and i'm ken bastida. jobs, taxes, health care. and big bird? yes, the first presidential debate is in the books. the consensus was that mitt romney desperately needed a strong showing. and as grace lee shows us, he pretty much delivered. >> reporter: the polls show that the former governor knocked it out of the park. 500 uncommitted voters asked who won this debate. 46% said it was romney. only 20% said the president was the victor for the night. the man who has been fighting to show that he relates to the average american this whole election cycle, 56% of those polled say they had a better opinion of the former governor now. what started out as cordial quickly became heated. >> governor romney's proposal that he's been promoting for 18 months calls for a $5 million tax cut. and he is saying that he is going to pay for it by closing loopholes in deductions. t
about what treatments are given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated that under his plan he would be able to cover people with preexisting conditions. well actually, governor, that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law which says if you are out of health insurance for three months than you can end up getting continuous coverage and an insurance company can't deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law. and that doesn't help the millions of people out there with preexisting conditions there's a why reason governor romney set up the plan that he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care, it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that insurers, you've got to take everybody. now, that also means that you've got more customers. but when governor romney says he'll replace it with something but can't detail how it will be, in fact, replaced and the reason he set up the system he did in massachusetts was beca
, constitutional law professor. >> both. because to win, because he's competitive, he needs to be cool. he knows that. that's the one overriding concern presented to him by his advisers. don't freak out. don't get anxious. don't get publicly visibly irritable. >> a lot of people support mitt romney over the weekend on the sunday talk shows were saying he has to be very aggressive. he really has to take it to the president. >> well, what happens in presidential debates is you have two fundamental goals as the candidate. drive your message and knock your opponent off his. and so to knock the president off his message the romney campaign knows governor romney has to be unrelenting. >> romney has an op-ed talking about his view on foreign policy. there seems to be some question within the romney camp as to whether they should even be talking about foreign policy. >> this has been an ongoing debate since the libya crisis. and in the immediate hours after that when governor romney stepped into this, his advisers said we're going to begin to prosecute this larger. if you look at that op-ed, it's not ju
supplements because federal law classifies them as food not drugs. products are required to be safe but the f.d.a. only monitors them after they're on the market. when it comes to proof, supplement makers are only required to say research has been done, they are not required to show it to the f.d.a. the natural products association-- the main trade group of the supplement industry-- issued a statement saying: the investigators looked at 127 supplements that claim to boost the immune system or help with weight loss. none-- none-- met all of the f.d.a.'s recommendations for proving the products actually work. >> pelley: and we should mention, jon, the report we're referring to was produced today by the department of health and human services. there's another medical story that we're following tonight, jon, a deadly outbreak of meningitis. it has spread to five states, 26 people have been infected, four have died. a suspected source is tainted steroid injections that is used to treat back pain. the medication came from a pharmacy in massachusetts that issued a recall last week. jon, what have yo
finally know his real name. >> authorityies say he's a harvard law school graduate who has been wanted by the fbi for a very long time. 48 hours correspondent erin moriarty has the story. >> john donald cody has been on the run since 1984 when he suddenly fell off the grid around the same time he was accused of fraud. cody and a man named bobby thompson are one in the same person and allege he's responsible for one of the largest charity scams in u.s. history. the many faces of a man who called himself bobby thompson, a master of disguise that authorities believe was hiding a checkered past. last april, thompson, posing as a retired canadian mounty, was resting at this house in oregon. >> not dressed up in a fancy suit, just a regular person. >> being pursued by authorities in a nine-state cross country manhunt as the alleged master mind behind an organization called the united states navy veterans association, a fake charity that took in $100 million in donations over an eight-year period. authorities say the money never got to the people it was supposed to. instead, with a reputation
wanted to put osama bin laden on trial to demonstrate the u.s. commitment to due process under law but that was if bin laden had surrendered during the raid in which he was killed. the book by journalist mark bowden entitled the finish is due out october 16. >>> 5:19 now. we'll find out in about 10 minutes how many americans are signing up for jobless claims. this morning, the labor department releases the weekly report on new jobless claims. tomorrow will gives the september employment report. yesterday a private payroll company said u.s. businesses added slightly more workers than expected last month. >>> it appears the star of the show punked was the target of a hoax. >> police swarmed ashton kutcher's hollywood hills home yesterday after a report of a break-in and shots fired. someone contacted police claiming there were men with guns inside the home. officers searched the house but only found three workers hired by kutcher. police suspect it was a case of swatting someone trying to get the s.w.a.t. team to respond. >> not good. >>> 5:20 right now. the underdogs are on top this
and brings out law enforcement, often including a s.w.a.t. team. it happened in computer gamers, conservative bloggers and even singer miley cyrus. someone called the police to her home in august with a 911 call reporting shots fired. it was yet another hoax but one with serious consequences. perpetrators face a $10,000 fine and up to three years in prison if caught. >> officers put thur lives on the line. every time they get a call, they're taking their lives at risk. >> he was not home wednesday morning but later tweeted from the set of his sitcom saying "safe and sound at two and a half men. don't miss tomorrow night at 8:30. >> you have a home here as long as you want. >> reporter: it may have been a hoax but that's no reason to pass up an opportunity for a little self promotion. for cbs this morning, ben tracy, los angeles. >> self promotion aside, it's just not funny. so far they have a hard time catching the people who are responsible for doing that. >> i never heard of that before. first time i heard of it. >> that's why we're here at "cbs this morning." that's what we do. >> yes. >>
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)